TAMU Law Co-Hosts 18th Annual Works-in-Progress IP Colloquium

Posted by Texas A&M School of Law on Mar 9, 2021 10:01:44 AM

This year, the 18th Annual Works-in-Progress Intellectual Property Colloquium (WIPIP), co-organized by Professors Glynn Lunney and Irene Calboli in partnership with American University’s Professor Christine Haight Farley and University of Utah University’s Professor Jorge Contreras, was a virtual event held over two successive weekends, February 11-13 and 18-20, 2021.

Founded by Professors Lunney and Mike Meurer (Boston University), the first WIPIP colloquium was held in 2003. From the outset, WIPIP has given IP scholars a forum in which to present and discuss their ongoing research.

Calboli WIPIP1

This year, one hundred scholars presented papers at WIPIP, which also featured four plenary sessions. The Conference opened with a panel discussion on Race, Gender, and IP, while a following session explored how to assess scholarly impact and the various challenges and opportunities related to this important topic.

During its second week, a panel of leading professors in their respective areas discussed International and Comparative IP. The panel included Jerome Reichman (Duke University), Jane Ginsburg (Columbia University), and Rochelle Dreyfuss (New York University).

On Friday February 19, WIPIP featured a discussion on the state of patent litigation with three federal district court judges: Judge Alan Albright of the Western District of Texas, Judge Cathy Bencivengo of the Southern District of California, and Chief Judge Leonard Stark of the District of Delaware.

Calobli WIPIP2

In addition to several days of informative and engaging academic discussion, WIPIP scholars enjoyed two games nights. On Saturday February 13, teams of scholars participated in a virtual game of “Escape from WIPIP Mountain." On February 20, the conference ended with a virtual version of the “Faculty Feud Game” and presentation of Session Awards.

Calboli WIPIP3

Although organizers hope this year will be the one and only meeting for WIPIP to be exclusively virtual, the conference was nonetheless a memorable one! During the course of the two weekends, IP scholars from all over the United States were able to meet, present their research and receive useful feedback.

Thank you again to all participants and all those whose hard work behind the scenes permitted the Conference to be such a successful event.

Topics: Law Professor, intellectual property

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About Texas A&M School of Law

Texas A&M School of Law is an American Bar Association-accredited institution located in downtown Fort Worth. In 2013, Texas A&M acquired Texas Wesleyan University School of Law. Since integrating with Texas A&M seven years ago, the law school has sustained a remarkable upward trajectory by dramatically increasing entering class credentials, improving U.S. News and World Report rankings, hiring 30 new faculty members, adding 10 clinics and six global field study destinations and expanding the depth and breadth of its career services, student services, academic support and admissions functions.

For more information, visit law.tamu.edu.

About Texas A&M University

Texas A&M, established in 1876 as the first public university in Texas, is one of the nation’s largest universities with more than 66,000 students and more than 440,000 living alumni residing in over 150 countries around the world. A tier-one university, Texas A&M holds the rare triple land-, sea- and space-grant designation. Research conducted at Texas A&M represented annual expenditures of more than $905.4 million in fiscal year 2017. Texas A&M’s research creates new knowledge that provides basic, fundamental and applied contributions resulting, in many cases, in economic benefits to the state, nation and world.

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As one of the world's leading research institutions, Texas A&M is at the forefront in making significant contributions to scholarship and discovery, including that of science and technology. Research conducted at Texas A&M represented annual expenditures of more than $905.4 million in fiscal year 2017. Texas A&M ranked in the top 20 of the National Science Foundation’s Higher Education Research and Development survey (2016), based on expenditures of more than $892.7 million in fiscal year 2016. Texas A&M’s research creates new knowledge that provides basic, fundamental and applied contributions resulting, in many cases, in economic benefits to the state, nation and world. To learn more, visit http://research.tamu.edu.