TAMU Law school to host Supreme Court arguments

Posted by Texas A&M School of Law on Oct 9, 2019, 11:35:59 AM

The Texas A&M University School of Law will give students and the public the opportunity to witness oral arguments in person when it hosts the Supreme Court of Texas Thursday, October 10.Supreme Court logo

The court will hear two cases beginning at 9 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 10. Building doors will open at 7:45 a.m. for security screening at the law school’s Commerce Street entrance. The public is asked to arrive no later than 8:20 a.m. to allow for passage through security before Dean Robert Ahdieh’s welcome remarks at 8:45 a.m.

The first case involves a Texas attorney who was sanctioned for the use of an alleged “push poll” to community members in Lubbock to test trial themes and arguments related to a products liability/wrongful death lawsuit. Then, the court will hear oral arguments in the second case, which is related to a dispute between ownership factions over decision-making authority for a limited liability company.

Each of the cases is expected to last about 40 minutes, with a 10-minute recess between arguments. After the cases are argued, there will be a question and answer period from 11-11:30 a.m. The oral arguments are open to the public, but RSVP is required and seating is limited.

“As a law school, we aim to serve as a meeting place for the Fort Worth community to gather together and engage the most challenging issues of the day – from healthcare and immigration to energy and innovation,” Texas A&M Law School Dean Robert B. Ahdieh says. “Hosting the Texas Supreme Court and bringing together the legal and business communities to participate in that visit offers a perfect opportunity for us.”

Only a small number of attendees will be seated in the courtroom due to capacity limitations. Overflow seating will be available in classrooms. The oral arguments will be webcast through a partnership with the State Bar of Texas.

No cell phone use will be allowed while the court is in session, and attendees should also dress appropriately for court. No backpacks, briefcases or large bags will be allowed, and hats are not to be worn in the courtroom. Additional security measures will also be in place, and the licensed carry of concealed handguns will be temporarily prohibited at the School of Law during the court’s visit from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Topics: Texas A&M University School of Law, tamu law, Texas Supreme Court

Subscribe Here!

Recent Post

Post By topics

See all

About Texas A&M School of Law

Texas A&M School of Law is an American Bar Association-accredited institution located in downtown Fort Worth. In 2013, the law school acquired Texas Wesleyan University School of Law. Since integrating with Texas A&M five years ago, the law school has sustained a remarkable upward trajectory by dramatically increasing entering class credentials, adding nine clinics and six global field study destinations, increasing the depth and breadth of its career services, student services, academic support and admissions functions and hiring twenty-six new faculty members.

For more information, visit law.tamu.edu.

About Texas A&M University

Texas A&M, established in 1876 as the first public university in Texas, is one of the nation’s largest universities with more than 66,000 students and more than 440,000 living alumni residing in over 150 countries around the world. A tier-one university, Texas A&M holds the rare triple land-, sea- and space-grant designation. Research conducted at Texas A&M represented annual expenditures of more than $905.4 million in fiscal year 2017. Texas A&M’s research creates new knowledge that provides basic, fundamental and applied contributions resulting, in many cases, in economic benefits to the state, nation and world.

About Research at Texas A&M University: As one of the world's leading research institutions, Texas A&M is at the forefront in making significant contributions to scholarship and discovery, including that of science and technology. Research conducted at Texas A&M represented annual expenditures of more than $905.4 million in fiscal year 2017. Texas A&M ranked in the top 20 of the National Science Foundation’s Higher Education Research and Development survey (2016), based on expenditures of more than $892.7 million in fiscal year 2016. Texas A&M’s research creates new knowledge that provides basic, fundamental and applied contributions resulting, in many cases, in economic benefits to the state, nation and world. To learn more, visit http://research.tamu.edu.