Teresa Reyes Flores '21 awarded Immigrant Justice Corps fellowship

Posted by Texas A&M School of Law on May 17, 2021 7:15:00 AM

Teresa-Reyes-Flores-680x906Teresa Reyes Flores '21 has been awarded a two-year Immigrant Justice Corps fellowship to work with Immigration Services and Legal Advocacy (ISLA) in New Orleans. She will be representing immigrants who are detained at Pine Prairie ICE Processing Center.

Flores's passion for immigration law stems from her family’s immigration story. As a first-generation American, she grew up watching her Salvadoran mother’s ten-year journey to obtaining lawful status. As a law clinic student in Texas A&M Law’s Immigrant Rights Clinic and intern with Kids in Need of Defense (KIND), Teresa worked on affirmative and defensive cases, including asylum and SIJ.

"In 7 years, IJC Fellows have had a profound impact on the delivery of legal services for immigrant poor," said IJC's founder, Robert A. Katzmann, Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, "I am confident that the 2021 Justice Fellows, with their impressive backgrounds and commitment to immigrants' rights, will help IJC continue to meet the deep need for quality legal counsel which makes all the difference."

The IJC program is the country's first fellowship program wholly dedicated to meeting immigrants' need for high-quality legal assistance. Twenty-eight graduates from top law schools and with impressive experience from around the country were chosen for the fellowship. 

Fellows serve for two years as staff attorneys at strategically selected legal services agencies and community-based organizations across the country, providing legal assistance to low-income immigrants in an array of immigration matters including deportation defense and affirmative applications for those fleeing persecution.

See the complete media release here.

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Texas A&M School of Law is an American Bar Association-accredited institution located in downtown Fort Worth. In 2013, Texas A&M acquired Texas Wesleyan University School of Law. Since integrating with Texas A&M seven years ago, the law school has sustained a remarkable upward trajectory by dramatically increasing entering class credentials, improving U.S. News and World Report rankings, hiring 30 new faculty members, adding 10 clinics and six global field study destinations and expanding the depth and breadth of its career services, student services, academic support and admissions functions.

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Texas A&M, established in 1876 as the first public university in Texas, is one of the nation’s largest universities with more than 66,000 students and more than 440,000 living alumni residing in over 150 countries around the world. A tier-one university, Texas A&M holds the rare triple land-, sea- and space-grant designation. Research conducted at Texas A&M represented annual expenditures of more than $905.4 million in fiscal year 2017. Texas A&M’s research creates new knowledge that provides basic, fundamental and applied contributions resulting, in many cases, in economic benefits to the state, nation and world.

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As one of the world's leading research institutions, Texas A&M is at the forefront in making significant contributions to scholarship and discovery, including that of science and technology. Research conducted at Texas A&M represented annual expenditures of more than $905.4 million in fiscal year 2017. Texas A&M ranked in the top 20 of the National Science Foundation’s Higher Education Research and Development survey (2016), based on expenditures of more than $892.7 million in fiscal year 2016. Texas A&M’s research creates new knowledge that provides basic, fundamental and applied contributions resulting, in many cases, in economic benefits to the state, nation and world. To learn more, visit http://research.tamu.edu.